Patrick Kessler, (Click HERE to visit my new site.)

Please enjoy the mesmerizing motion of Euler's Disk as it rolls without slipping over a surface:

My goal is to develop a pervasive understanding of dynamics in a mathematical context. Machines fascinate me, even simple ones like Euler's Disk. Describing these with images and numbers is what engineering is all about.

Occupation:
I just finished six wonderful years in Mechanical Engineering at U.C. Berkeley. I have had a wonderful time solving various problems under the direction of Oliver O'Reilly. I am currently working at a south bay fruit company, where I design cool gadgets and gizmos, sort of like these.
Research Interests:
Characterizing the geometry of tangled physical curves, such as the backbone curves of protein molecules. Data visualization. Simulation of dynamical systems. Vehicle navigation and control. Numerical methods in mechanics.
Publications:
P. Kessler,  On the Shapes of Tangled Curves, October, 2007.
This is my Dissertation.
P. Kessler and O. M. O'Reilly, Curve Encirclement and Protein Structure,
Published in PRL.
P. Kessler,  A Geometric Characterization of Solutions to the Algebraic Riccati Equation, September, 2006.
This is my Math Masters Thesis, which I worked on under the guidance of Maciej Zworski. Berkeley's bizzare
thesis formatting rules increased the length of my work by a factor of 3, click here for the long version.
P. Kessler, O. M. O'Reilly, A.L. Raphael and M. Zworski,
On Dissipation-Induced Destabilization and Brake Squeal: A Structured Pseudospectral Perspective,
Published in JSV.
J.P. Coaplen, P. Kessler, O.M. O'Reilly, D.M. Stevens, and J.K. Hedrick,
On Navigation Systems for Motorcycles, The Journal of Navigation, vol. 58, pp. 375-388, (2005).
P. Kessler,  Motorcycle Navigation with Two Sensors, UC Berkeley Mechanical Engineering M.S. Thesis,
March 2004.
S.M. Shahruz, P. Kessler,  Residual Motion in Damped Linear Systems,
Journal of Sound and Vibration. Vol. 276(3-5), pp. 1093-1100 (2004).
P. Kessler, O.M. O'Reilly,  The Ringing of Euler’s Disk, Regular and Chaotic Dynamics.
Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 49-60 (2002). This paper has been translated into Russian!
Other Printed Matter:
A letter I sent to the editors of American Scientist got printed in vol. 93, num. 6, Nov-Dec 2005.
Unfortunately, the short algorithm I suggested for flipping mattresses was misprinted in the magazine.
A recent article in Forfront explains how Oliver and some of his students (including me) use toys to
understand major concepts in mechanics.
Oliver and I were thrilled to have our work on spinning disks mentioned in The Velocity of Honey by
Jay Ingram. If you're interested in a chatty and accessible exposition of various hot topics in modern
day science, you should definitely buy this book.
Awards:
I am very happy to have received Berkeley's Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award!
My GSI History:
2004, Spring: E77 with Panos Papadopoulos and Michael Frenklach. Evaluations
2004, Fall: E77 with Panos Papadopoulos and Andrew Packard (as head GSI). Evaluations
2005, Spring: E77 with Jaime Rector. Evaluations
2005, Fall: E77 with Roberto Horowitz and Robert Dibble. Evaluations
2006, Spring: Math128a with John Neu. Also helped Oliver O'Reilly with ME175. Evaluations
2006, Fall: ME170 with Oliver O'Reilly. Evaluations
2007, Spring: ME175 with James Casey and ME104 with Fai Ma. Evaluations
Academic History:
(All degrees awarded by the University of California at Berkeley.)
Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering -October, 2007.
M.A. Mathematics -September, 2006.
M.S. Mechanical Engineering -March, 2004.
B.S. Mechanical Engineering -May, 2001.
My Notes:
  • Partial Fractions Expansion.
  • Equations of motion for a chain of point masses.
  • Summary of Operator Facts and Terminology from Linear Algebra Done Right.
  • Integrability of vector fields.
  • The Serret-Frenet Triad.
  • Links:
  • Thesis Statement Tips
  • The Cal Running Club!
  • Berkeley Juggling.
  • A wonderful site for visualizing juggling patterns.
  • Timezone, an active community of watch enthusiasts. The articles published here are great!
  • ThePurists, more watch enthusiasts. Articles, watch reviews, and links to other sites.
  • Horology: the index, an out of date index to some neat clock and watch sites.
  • George Hart: Reminds me of Escher.
  • Arthur Ganson: A sculpter of marvelous machines.
  • Biographies of Mathematicians
  • The Long Now foundation. These guys are building an incredible clock.
  • My brother likes neurons, my dad likes France, and my mom likes to play the harp.
  • Personal Interests:
  • making things
  • travelling to exotic locals. I just got back from a trip to Peru!
  • designing, building, and repairing anything horological
  • theory, history and continuing developement of watch and clock mechanisms
  • athletics: running, unicycling, juggling, hiking, frisbee, soccer, etc
  • media and graphic design, especially data visualization
  • novel and ingenious mechanisms, like astrolabes and planemeters
  • dynamics and differential geometry
  • sculpture and spatial form (i can wander around museums for hours)
  • Dali, Escher and so on
  • anything challanging to my imagination
  • writing and sketching (i try to keep a journal)
  • cheap novels, literature, and books on history
  • music: Bach, Beethovan, Mozart, Madonna, Kylie, Queen, Shakira and lots more
  • piano & organ playing (unfortunately for my neighbors)
  • stirling cycle engines
  • mechancial computers: adding machines, slide rules, etc
  • Contact: Continuum Mechanics Lab 2165 Etcheverry Hall (tel. 510-642-4974).
    watchwrk@newton.berkeley.edu